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Sierra working on consistency at the plate

Sierra working on consistency at the plate play video for Sierra working on consistency at the plate

CHICAGO -- Moises Sierra made his first start as part of the White Sox, taking over in right field Tuesday after Adam Dunn was scratched with a bruised right calf, and delivered a career-high four hits in a 5-1 victory over the Cubs. The right-handed-hitting Sierra was claimed off of waivers from the Blue Jays on Saturday after being designated for assignment on May 1.

"I feel very happy to be here," said Sierra, before the game, through interpreter and White Sox manager of cultural development Lino Diaz. "I feel happy that the organization picked me up off waivers. Those were kind of tough times for me, so I'm very happy to be here.

"We're going to work on consistency. My consistency at the plate is one of those things that hasn't been there. We're going to work hard with the people here, the hitting coach, and whoever can help me. I'm willing to work."

Sierra, 25, was 2-for-34 in 34 games with the Blue Jays this season, but he hit .317 (26-for-82) with 12 doubles and 11 RBIs last September. Sierra ranked among the American Leaguer leaders last September in doubles (third), extra-base hits (tied for fourth, 14), slugging percentage (eighth, .524) and on-base percentage (ninth, .385).

Because of injuries to Adam Eaton and Avisail Garcia, Sierra will get more of an extended chance to prove himself with the White Sox.

"We're in a spot where we can give a guy a shot for a little while and see what happens," White Sox manager Robin Ventura said.

"Absolutely, I remember that as a positive," said Sierra of last September. "Last year, I was able to do a few things right, and I had some pretty good results offensively. I had the consistency of playing every day. That to me is important to get in a rhythm."

Scott Merkin is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Merk's Works, and follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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