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'Dirtbag' Eaton brings energy to South Side

'Dirtbag' Eaton brings energy to South Side

'Dirtbag' Eaton brings energy to South Side

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- How did Adam Eaton find out about his move from Arizona to the White Sox on Tuesday as part of three-team team deal also involving the Angels and sending left-handed starter Hector Santiago from Chicago to Anaheim? He simply followed the media's updates on Twitter.

"Twitter has been the main culprit," Eaton told MLB.com during a phone interview from his Ohio home. "I woke up at 8 or 9, and you start hearing some tweets toward me. You hear talk. At 10 or 11 o'clock, it builds up a little bit. By 12 or 1 Eastern Time, it's in full swing."

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In the 5-foot-8, 185-pound Eaton, the White Sox added balance to their lineup from the left side and an addition of speed at the top of their order. They also have a solid defensive player with a plus arm in center. Then there's the dirtbag mentality, which was how general manager Rick Hahn described Eaton on Tuesday.

It was an edge missing from the '13 White Sox clubhouse, as talked about by bench coach Mark Parent near the end of the season. It's an edge and depiction Eaton happily embraces.

"That's a high compliment to be a dirtbag," Eaton said. "I'm kind of a pain in the butt, a grinder. A guy who will get after it day in and day out, bring energy to the team.

"I thrive on energy. I break up a double play and see the fire in the guys and they feed off that. ... I'm high energy and trying to help our team score as many runs or win as many games as possible."

Eaton grew up an Indians fan in Ohio but is very familiar with the White Sox from watching American League Central baseball.

"I'm excited to be back in the Midwest," said Eaton, who has a college teammate from Miami of Ohio who lives in Chicago. "My mom and dad are five hours away and my in-laws are just four."

Scott Merkin is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Merk's Works, and follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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