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McCreery stops by U.S. Cellular Field to promote RBI

McCreery stops by U.S. Cellular Field to promote RBI

McCreery stops by U.S. Cellular Field to promote RBI

CHICAGO -- Scotty McCreery is best known for winning Season 10 of American Idol in 2011. But few people know he almost became a part of the White Sox organization one year later.

Actually, he almost was a pick in the 2012 First-Year Player Draft, as McCreery explained Sunday at U.S. Cellular Field.

"The White Sox called me up wanting to draft me, more for a publicity stunt," said a smiling McCreery, who pitched throughout high school. "I had to fill out the draft sheet and they said they were going to draft me the last round. We had the big draft party, I waited it out, but I never heard the name called, so it's all good."

McCreery made his first trip to U.S. Cellular Field, as he was scheduled to sing God Bless America as part of his ballpark tour in partnership with Major League Baseball to promote the Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) program. McCreery first became involved in the program by donating money to Nashville inner cities.

"A lot of my memories were growing up playing ball as a little kid," McCreery said. "I'm just trying to help those kids out in inner cities and making sure they have the opportunity to play ball as well and get to the field and get the equipment. Make sure the kids are having the same fun as we did back in the day.

"We are going out to different parks and kind of getting some publicity to make sure more people are aware of it and can help out if they want to as well. Doing that and singing a little bit. Just kind of hanging out and having fun."

Despite McCreery's love for America's pastime and his excitement for visiting the White Sox, he wouldn't have given up singing if the White Sox selected him.

"No, I was in no way shape or form a pro prospect," McCreery said. "They were having fun with it. So I went along with it for sure."

Scott Merkin is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Merk's Works, and follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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