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Sox want a 'blackout' for Tuesday

Sox want a 'blackout' for Tuesday

CHICAGO -- A blackout coming in a city the size of Chicago usually leads to more than a fair share of worry and maybe a few dire circumstances.

That blackout takes on a completely different meaning, though, when it represents Sox Pride as part of Tuesday's one-game tiebreaker between the White Sox and Twins to decide the American League Central champion at 6:30 p.m. CT on TBS and MLB.TV. The team is urging fans attending Tuesday's game to wear all black in support of the team.

There will be 40,000 "Sox Pride" towels distributed as fans enter the ballpark for the first pitch.

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"We will have 40,000 black rally towels, and hopefully, 40,000 fans using them in support of the team," said White Sox vice president and chief marketing officer Brooks Boyer of the unique support system. "Hopefully, it will be pretty darn intimidating, and the Twins can see how it's done Chicago style."

Boyer had the second part of his wish come true approximately one hour after the White Sox forced Tuesday's tiebreaker with an 8-2 victory over the Tigers on Monday. An announcement came across the loud speakers at U.S. Cellular Field making clear that Tuesday's game was a complete sellout.

Now it's up to those same White Sox fans to take this enthusiasm a step further by becoming the men and women in black. The Twins had a deafening home crowd behind them for three games at the Metrodome, and the South Siders hope Tuesday's "blackout" leads to a playoff berth in the AL Division Series against the Tampa Bay Rays.

"It's a better idea than white because that would make it tough to see the ball," said a smiling White Sox team captain Paul Konerko, who has witnessed the whiteout in person at Phoenix Coyotes game. "It will be cool.

"If there was any regret about '05, it was that we didn't celebrate at home. That's because we took care of business on the road. It would be great to have the chance to celebrate in front of our home crowd, because you never know when you will get that chance again."

Scott Merkin is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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