Rodon keeps rolling as Sox top Mariners

Rodon keeps rolling as Sox top Mariners

CHICAGO -- Carlos Rodon continued his strong stretch through August, allowing two runs across six-plus innings as the White Sox defeated the Mariners, 4-2, on Thursday night at U.S. Cellular Field. Adam Eaton scored three runs and reached base four times while Avisail Garcia knocked him in twice.

Rodon struck out five and gave up just three hits, and didn't give up a run until the seventh inning when Franklin Gutierrez connected on his ninth home run of the season. Rodon has had fourth straight quality starts with a 1.61 ERA in that stretch.

"I've just learned how to pitch a little more, I'll put it that way," Rodon said. "I'm just having fun, just being a good teammate and just learning the little things."

Rodon, Eaton on win vs. Mariners

Seattle starter Roenis Elias struggled to work a clean inning, but he did limit the damage in his first start since July 2. The left-hander allowed four runs on nine hits across 6 2/3 innings, but allowed baserunners in all but the fourth inning.

"I felt good. My fastball command was a lot better," Elias said through an interpreter. "My curveball was not very good. I'd try to throw it for a strike and it was in the dirt."

Elias fans Sanchez

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Escape artist: With no outs, two runs already in and the tying runs on second and third, the Mariners seemed poised for a big inning in the seventh. But left-hander Zach Duke -- who allowed a double to the first batter he faced -- struck out Brad Miller and Mike Zunino and then got Ketel Marte to fly out to center to end the inning, preserving the White Sox's 4-2 lead.

"It's not easy coming in there and being able to do that but Dukie handled himself great," White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. "He gave up the first hit and really beared down and got through the rest of it."

Duke stifles Mariners

Leaving them stranded: The Mariners threatened to jump out to a lead in the first inning, but Rodon struck out Mark Trumbo to leave the bases loaded. Austin Jackson hit a one-out single before Robinson Cano and Gutierrez walked, but Rodon got Trumbo out on a foul tip. It wasn't the only chance for Seattle, which stranded runners in scoring position in both the seventh and eighth innings.

"We had opportunities early and didn't take advantage of them," said Mariners manager Lloyd McClendon. "We had opportunities throughout the game and didn't take advantage of them. If we went up without a bat, we probably would have had a run in and the bases loaded. That's tough."

Double your pleasure: Already leading, 1-0, the White Sox pushed across a pair of runs in the third to make it 3-0. Jose Abreu drove in the first run with a double and later scored on a double from rookie Trayce Thompson.

Abreu's RBI double

QUOTABLE
"He's got great stuff, so when he's on like that, that's usually the result you get from him." -- Zunino on facing Rodon

LOOKIN' GOOD
For Throwback Thursday, the White Sox wore the softball-style uniforms originally from the 1976-81 seasons. The white jerseys were pullovers with a vee neck and a navy blue collar to match the pants. The jerseys were designed to be worn outside of the pants. More >

"I might just leave it on after the game," Tyler Saladino said. "Just go out and grab a bite to eat."

Sox booth on throwback jerseys

WHAT'S NEXT
Mariners: Taijuan Walker (9-7, 4.73 ERA) makes his second straight start against the White Sox, this time away from home for Game 2 of a four-game series on Friday night. Walker allowed five runs on seven hits but still picked up the win his last time out. First pitch from U.S. Cellular Field is scheduled for 5:10 p.m. PT.

White Sox: John Danks (6-11, 4.90 ERA) was roughed up for seven runs on eight hits on Sunday vs. the Mariners. The left-hander is 4-3 with a 3.45 ERA in 12 home starts this season. First pitch is 7:10 p.m. CT.

Watch every out-of-market regular season game live on MLB.TV.

Greg Garno is an associate reporter for MLB.com. John Jackson is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.